The MLA format works cited generator is primarily used to create sources in the Modern Language Association format.

MLA Format Works Cited Generator: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3XO5C42VKA
MLA Format Works Cited Generator is available on a number of websites. However, the factor that differentiates one website from the another is the availability of tools that vary from one website to another. The MLA Format Works Cited Generator comes across as an individual’s best friend especially in two unique situations. The first situation is when the person is late in delivering work while on the other hand the second situation is when a person does not enjoy writing a citation.
It is absolutely essential for individuals to choose the right kind of MLA source list. If a traditional works cited page fails to satisfy and individual’s requirement then in that case the person can opt for an annotated list of works cited. Apart from this the MLA Format Works Cited Generator is believed to provide utmost freedom and independence to individuals as far as pursuing their research work is concerned.
MLA Format Guide to help you create your MLA citations for all sources. Learn how to cite a website, cite a book, cite a journal and many others.
Citation Machine helps students and professionals properly credit the information that they use. Cite your book in MLA format for free.
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Your Ultimate MLA Format Guide & Generator. What is MLA? MLA stands for the Modern Language Association.
This MLA citation tool generates the works cited page entries by using the proper MLA format. The tool follows the latest style and rules.
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Creating a Works Cited list using the eighth edition
MLA has turned to a style of documentation that is based on a general method that may be applied to every possible source, to many different types of writing. But since texts have become increasingly mobile, and the same document may be found in several different sources, following a set of fixed rules is no longer sufficient.
The current system is based on a few principles, rather than an extensive list of specific rules. While the handbook still gives examples of how to cite sources, it is organized according to the process of documentation, rather than by the sources themselves. This process teaches writers a flexible method that is universally applicable. Once you are familiar with the method, you can use it to document any type of source, for any type of paper, in any field.
Here is an overview of the process:
When deciding how to cite your source, start by consulting the list of core elements. These are the general pieces of information that MLA suggests including in each Works Cited entry. In your citation, the elements should be listed in the following order:
Author.
Title of source.
Title of container,
Other contributors,
Version,
Number,
Publisher,
Publication date,
Location.
Each element should be followed by the punctuation mark shown here. Earlier editions of the handbook included the place of publication, and required punctuation such as journal editions in parentheses, and colons after issue numbers. In the current version, punctuation is simpler (just commas and periods separate the elements), and information about the source is kept to the basics.
How the Modern Language Association Helps You Become a Responsible Researcher
What is MLA format?
The Modern Language Association is an organization that was created to develop guidelines on everything language and literature related. They have guidelines on proper grammar usage and research paper layouts. In addition, they have English and foreign language committees, numerous books and journal publications, and an annual conference.
What are citations?
The Modern Language Association is responsible for creating standards and guidelines on how to properly cite sources to prevent plagiarism. Their style is most often used when writing papers and citing sources in the liberal arts and humanities fields. Liberal arts is a broad term used to describe a range of subjects including the humanities, formal sciences such as mathematics and statistics, natural sciences such as biology and astronomy, and social science such as geography, economics, history, and others. The humanities specifically focuses on subjects related to languages, art, philosophy, religion, music, theater, literature, and ethics.
Believe it or not, there are thousands of other types of citation styles. While this citation style is most often used for the liberal arts and humanities fields, many other subjects, professors, and schools prefer citations and papers to be styled in MLA format.
Why do we use this style?
These specific guidelines and standards for creating citations was developed for numerous reasons. When scholars and researchers in the literature, language, and numerous other fields all cite their sources in the same manner, it makes it easier for readers to look at a citation and recognize and understand the different components of a source. From looking at a citation, we can see who the author is, the title of the source, when it was published, and other identifiable pieces of information.
Imagine how difficult it would be to understand the various components of a source if we didn’t all follow the same guidelines! Not only would it make it difficult to understand the source that was used, but it would also make it difficult for readers to locate it themselves. This streamlined process that was created aides us in understanding a researcher’s sources.
How is the new version different than previous versions?
This citation style has changed dramatically over the past couple of years. Currently in its 8th edition, the 8th version is a citation style that is much different than the previous formatting style.
In the 7th version, which is the format, or structure, that was previously used, researchers and scholars found it grueling to put their citations together. Why? Each source used a different citation structure. Researchers and scholars were required to look up the citation format that matched the type of source they used. So, if a person used a book, a website, a journal article, a newspaper article, and an e-book, all in one research project, they were required to look up how to cite each one of those sources because each was structured differently.
Now, with the new version of MLA formatting, which is version 8, all source types use the same citation structure. The Modern Language Association enacted this new format due to the many new and innovative ways of obtaining information. We are no longer receiving information through traditional means, such as books, websites, and articles. We can now obtain information through apps, advertisements, Tweets, other social media posts, and many other creative ways. To make the process of creating citations easier for researchers and scholars, the Modern Language Association decided to have one MLA citing format, which works for all source types.
What am I Citing?
BOOK
A written work or composition found in print, or digitally as an e-book. Can be non-fiction or fiction.
MAGAZINE
A popular work published periodically (weekly, monthly etc.) focusing on a specific interest or subject.
NEWSPAPER
A periodical publication containing current events, news, interviews and opinion articles.
WEBSITE
A collection of pages that provides information about a certain topic.
JOURNAL
A scholarly work published periodically, containing highly specified research.
FILM
A motion picture or movie. Can be a fictional movie, documentary or even YouTube videos.
What is Cite This For Me’s MLA Citation Generator?
Are you looking for an easy and reliable way to cite your sources in the MLA format? Look no further because Cite This For Me’s citation generator is designed to remove the hassle of citing. You can use it to save valuable time by auto-generating all of your citations in an instant.
Cite This For Me's citation machine accesses information from across the web, assembling all of the relevant material into a fully-formatted works cited page that clearly maps out all of the sources that have contributed to your paper. Using an open-access generator simplifies the frustrating citing process, allowing you to focus on what’s important: completing your assignment to the best of your ability.
Have you encountered an unusual source, such as a microfiche or a handwritten manuscript, and are unsure how to accurately cite this in the MLA format? Or are you struggling with the dozens of different ways to cite a book? If you need a helping hand with creating your citations, Cite This For Me’s accurate and powerful generator will get you one step closer to the finishing line.
Continue reading our handy style guide to learn how to cite like a pro. Find out exactly what a citation generator is, how to implement the MLA style in your writing, and how to organize and present your work according to the guidelines.
Why Do I Need To Cite?
Whenever you use someone else’s ideas or words in your own work, even if you have paraphrased or completely reworded the information, you must ‘give credit where credit is due’ to avoid charges of plagiarism. All of the source material that has contributed to your work must be acknowledged with an MLA in-text citation (also known as a parenthetical citation and feature in your works cited list. The only exceptions to this rule are everyday phrases (e.g. all the world’s a stage) and common knowledge (e.g. President Kennedy was killed in 1963).
The importance of crediting your sources goes far beyond ensuring that you don’t lose points on your assignment for citing incorrectly. Whilst it may be a tedious process without an MLA citation machine, attributing your research is essential in validating the statements and conclusions you make in your work. What’s more, drawing on numerous sources elevates your understanding of the topic, and accurately citing these sources reflects the impressive research journey that you have embarked on.
What is the MLA Format?
The format was developed by the Modern Languages Association as a consistent way of documenting sources used in academic writing. It is a concise style predominantly used in the liberal arts and humanities; first and foremost in research focused on languages, literature, and culture. You can find out more here.
It is important to present your work consistently, regardless of the style you are using. Accurately and coherently crediting your source material both demonstrates your attention to detail and enhances the credibility of your written work. The MLA format provides a uniform framework for consistency across a scholarly document, and caters to a large variety of sources. So, whether you are citing a website, an article, or even a podcast, the style guide outlines everything you need to know to correctly format all of your MLA citations.* The style also provides specific guidelines for formatting your research paper, and useful tips on the use of the English language in your writing.
Cite This For Me’s style guide is based on the 7th edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. Our open generator also uses the 7th edition - allowing you to shift focus from the formatting of your citations to what’s important - how each source contributes to your work.
The style has been widely adopted by scholars, professors, journal publishers, and both academic and commercial presses across the world. However, many academic institutions and disciplines prefer a specific style of referencing (or have even developed their own unique format) so be sure to check which style you should be using with your professor. You can also find your college’s style by logging into your Cite This For Me account and setting your institution in ‘My Profile’. Whichever style you’re using, be consistent!
So, if you’re battling to get your citations finished in time, you’ve come to the right place. The generator above will create your citations in the MLA style by default, it can cite any source in 1,000+ styles. So, whether your discipline uses the APA citation style, or your institution requires you to cite in the Chicago style citation, simply go to Cite This For Me's website to find generators and style guides for ASA, IEEE, AMA, Harvard and many more.
*You may need to cite a source type that is not covered by the format manual - for these instances we have developed additional guidance and MLA format examples, which stick as closely as possible to the spirit of the style. Where examples are not covered in the official handbook, this is clearly indicated.
How Do I Create and Format MLA In-text Citations?
The MLA format is generally simpler than other referencing styles as it was developed to emphasize brevity and clarity. The style uses a straightforward two-part documentation system for citing sources: parenthetical citations in the author-page format that are keyed to an alphabetically ordered works cited page. This means that the author’s last name and the page number(s) from which the quotation or paraphrase is taken must appear in the text as a parenthetical citation, and a complete corresponding reference should appear in your works cited list.
Keep your MLA in-text citations brief, clear and accurate by only including the information needed to identify the sources. Furthermore, each parenthetical citation should be placed close to the idea or quote being cited, where a natural pause occurs – which is usually at the end of the sentence. Essentially you should be aiming to position your parenthetical citations where they minimize interruption to the reading flow, which is particularly important in an extensive piece of written work.